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I’m about to have my oil pan off to install the baffle and I was wondering if any of the bearings look worn if I could just replace them right then and there? I know if there’s clearance problems I can’t but if not could I do this?
 

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08 TrailblazerSS AWD
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Don’t know how you’ll inspect the bearings without talking the main caps out and dropping the crankshaft. Unless there is some wizardry that I don’t know about! Lol!
 

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I thought with the oil pan off you would have access to the bearings
Indirectly. You'll have to remove the main caps. Then figure out how to get the up have of the bearing out.
 

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Rod bearings....simple. Mains, a bit trickier....as you will need to roll them out. In both cases it will be difficult if not impossible to verify clearances with the new bearings though. Best you can do is replace them with the same ones you take out...but be aware, while there are the the typical 10/20 oversize, there are also .001 over/under that the factory can fit when building the motor. They can also have a +/- half shell and a standard shell on the other half to take up .0005. You wont know this until you take them out, so if you are SURE this is a factory new engine (not rebuild) get a set of standard bearings, and a couple +.001 and a couple -.001 just in case. I like Clevite coated bearings....they are VERY durable and good on the street. The coating helps should, even post baffle, you dip pressure and get some slight contact.
FYI, I also added a good set of ARP rod bolts while I was in mine. GREAT time to do this and good insurance
 

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A lot of folks with the pan out will plug what I think is called the oil bypass. To ensure consistent oil pressure especially when running a higher volume pump. Other than a tap and plug I’m not completely sure on how it all works or pros/cons
 

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With the engine out, you loosen all the main caps at once, a good 5 turns on each bolt. That allows the crank to sort of hang free. Then pull one main cap at a time, use the main cap half of the bearing to push out the top half. You might have to bend the bearing a little straighter to push it into the tiny gap, between the block and crank. Remember to push from the opposite side of the wedge end of the bearing so it can come out first. Front of the crank get a little less room because of the timing chain, so start at the rear to make it easier and learn the technique. This has to be done with the engine in the normal upright position, so gravity helps let the crank drop away from the upper bearing. Does not work as well on an engine stand with the bottom of engine facing up. When all the mains are done retorque all the bearing caps. To get a measurement you "might" be able to compare the thickness of the old bearing to the thickness of a new bearing. Not the best, but better than guessing. Rod bearing are simple, rotate the crank till both bolts are simple to reach, Loosen the bolts, pull cap off, switch bearings and retorque. Would be a great time to upgrade rod bolts, like suggest by another guy. Hope this explains it for you.
 
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